mlemmonsdesigns

Beautiful designs for adventurous knitters

House of the Rising Sun April 10, 2013

Filed under: Knitting,new pattern,tutorial — mlemmonsdesigns @ 11:06 am

Last Friday, my newest shawl design, House of the Rising Sun, made it’s debut at DFW Fiber Fest in the Knitting Rose booth.

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Worked from the top down, House of the Rising Sun is a dynamic triangular shawl that will keep you on your toes with a variety of techniques and color changes. Ripples of color end in lacy points reminiscent of sun beams. The cut out neck and central panel will keep this shawl perfectly poised on your shoulders all day.

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Perfect for pairing a variegated and solid yarn, this shawl uses a beautiful combination of ripples and elongated slip stitch cables. These elongated cables create a splendid embossed effect in three bold panels. The color changes in this pattern have you working from different directions sometimes working two right sides or two wrong sides in a row.

So pick out your favorite skein of variegated fingering weight yarn and a coordinating solid, preferably in a color that is in the variegated, and cast on.

You will be able to see the shawl in person in the Knitting Rose booth at Stitches South, April 11-14, booth 524, and at Yellow Rose Fiber Producers, April 19-21. You should totally check our Lise’s yarn if you haven’t used it before. Her colors are gorgeous and the yarn is fabulous. And Lise is the sweetest person you’ll ever meet. She’ll help you pick the perfect yarn combo for  your shawl.

Here is a photo tutorial on how to do the elongated slip stitch cables that create the embossed panels.

The set up row for the cabled panels has 4 k1els which are: k1 elongated – k1, wrapping yarn around needle 4 times. Drop extra loops on next row.

Here’s how that looks when you work it.

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At the end of the first contrast color row, both yarns will be at the same end of the work, like this. So you’ll then need to push the knitting to the other end of the needle in order to work the next row in the main color.

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When you get to the 4 wraps of the elongated stitches, you will slip the stitch purlwise and drop the extra loops. When working from the wrong side, slip the stitch with the yarn in front. When working from the right side, slip the stitch with the yarn in back.

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On the next two rows, slip the elongated stitches purlwise, again with yarn in front when on a WS and with yarn in back when working on the RS. Notice that the stitches next to the elongated stitch are also very loose. Don’t worry, they will tighten up by the time the elongated stitches are finished and all the slack is pulled out.

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Before working a contrast color (CC) row from the WS. The two yarns are at different ends of the work.

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The first cable that you’re going to work is an ELCP – Elongated Left Cross Purl – Slip 5 sts purlwise from left to right needle,

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drop first elongated st from left needle toward back of work, slip 3 sts purlwise from left to right needle, drop second elongated st from left needle toward back of work.

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Slip 8 sts back to left needle without twisting. Replace the first dropped st on the right needle without twisting, p3, replace the second dropped st on the right needle without twisting,

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p1el, p3, p1el. p1el = p1 elongated – p1, wrapping yarn around needle 4 times. Drop extra loops on next row.

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The next cable is an ERCP – Elongated Right Cross Purl – Drop first elongated st from left needle toward back of work,

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p1el,

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p2, drop second elongated st from left needle toward back of work,

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p1, p1el, replace the first dropped st on the right needle without twisting,

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p3, replace the second dropped st on the right needle without twisting.

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On the next row, working with the main color (MC), knit into the elongated stitches that have been slipped for 4 rows.

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Slip the new elongated stitches purlwise and drop the extra loops.

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For the next two rows, slip the elongated stitches and work the rest of the stitches as they appear. Here’s how the work will look before a CC row worked from the RS.

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The next cable worked is an ERC – Elongated Right Cross – Slip 5 sts purlwise from left to right needle, drop first elongated st from left needle toward front of work, slip 3 sts purlwise from left to right needle, drop second elongated st from left needle toward front of work.

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Slip 8 sts back to left needle without twisting. Replace the first dropped st on the right needle without twisting, k3, replace the second dropped st on the right needle without twisting, k1el, k3, k1el.

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The next cable is an ELC – Elongated Left Cross- Drop first elongated st from left needle toward front of work, k1el, k2, drop second elongated st from left needle toward front of work, k1, k1el,

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replace the first dropped st on the right needle without twisting, k3, replace the second dropped st on the right needle without twisting.

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On the next MC row, purl the old elongated stitches that have been slipped for 4 rows.

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Slip the new elongated stitches purlwise, dropping the extra loops.

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To finish off the cabled panels you will work a RC – Right Cross – Slip 5 sts purlwise from left to right needle, drop first elongated st from left needle toward front of work, slip 3 sts purlwise from left to right needle, drop second elongated st from left needle toward front of work. Slip 8 sts back to left needle without twisting. Replace the first dropped st on the right needle without twisting,

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k3, replace the second dropped st on the right needle without twisting, k5.

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Next up is a LC – Left Cross – Drop first elongated st from left needle toward front of work, k3, drop second elongated st from left needle toward front of work, k2, replace the first dropped st on the right needle without twisting, k3, replace the second dropped st on the right needle without twisting.

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Finished panel.

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Beading Trick March 1, 2012

Filed under: tutorial — mlemmonsdesigns @ 1:31 pm
Tags: ,

I love knitting beaded lace. Obviously, since Nouveau Beaded Capelet has 5082 beads. But knitting with beads can be tedious because it requires constantly stopping and starting to deal with the beads. If the beads are pre-strung, then you have to keep pushing them down the yarn. If you are placing them individually  with a crochet hook or Super Floss, you have to stop to but each bead on. This usually means putting at least one needle down. For a pattern where the beads are more spread out, this is not too bad. But if the beads are placed closely and frequently, it is really hard to get into a rhythm while knitting.

While working on my latest pattern, I decided that I needed a better method that disrupted my knitting less. It took me awhile to come up with this method. First, I was using a sz 14 crochet hook. I would put 5 beads on it at a time and then was holding it in my mouth so that I didn’t have to pick it up every time. But it was hard to hold it at the right angle so that the beads didn’t fall off, and it tasted weird. So then I tried just keeping it in my right hand while knitting. That didn’t work at all. I ended up putting it in my left hand behind the knitting when it wasn’t in use. This worked ok. But then the next time I came to do some knitting, I couldn’t find the hook anywhere. I suspect collusion between the toddler and the couch. So I decided to switch to Super Floss, but my big pack is missing. Then I remembered that I had beaded with beading wire before. And I was able to find the beading wire!!! We had a winner!

I got to work, but it was still tedious. It was great that I could thread 50+ beads on at a time, but I still had to pick up the wire every time. Then I had a eureka moment.

Beading wire is really thin. Thin enough that I could pin it through my shirt. That made it so that it stayed attached to me, but I still had to pick up the other end. I tried holding it in my mouth again, but that was awkward. Then I determined that I could leave the wire hooked through the last stitch until I needed it again. Now my shirt and the knitting were keeping the beading wire in place. I wasn’t having to drop the yarn while placing the bead, so I was able to get into a better rhythm or flow.

Here are some pictures describing my new beading trick.

First, cut a piece of beading wire about 12″/30cm long. I used .015″/ .38mm Tiger Tail wire which is nylon coated braided stainless steel. Fold back a section about 1″/2.5cm at each end and crease.

Then, use a floss threader to thread the beads onto wire. Leave some space at the end of the wire so that there is room for the beads to slide over the folded over piece.

Next, thread the wire through the fabric of your shirt along the neckline. You can also use this method using Super Floss and a safety pin to attach the wire to your shirt.

Thread the hook at the free end of the wire through the next stitch that needs to be beaded.

Pull the stitch off the needle and onto the wire. Then slide a bead down over the bent back piece of wire.

Slide the bead off the wire and onto the stitch.

Place the stitch back onto the left needle. Leave the wire in the stitch.

Work that stitch, still leaving the wire hooked in the stitch. This leaves the wire in a place that is easy to get to while still holding onto your knitting later.

Here is a picture of the wire loaded with beads hanging between my shirt and my knitting. Leave the wire threaded through that last beaded stitch until you get to the next stitch that needs to be beaded.

Another advantage to this trick is that if you get interrupted and have to get up for awhile, but will be coming back to  knitting later, you can thread the other end of the wire through your shirt as well. The beads can’t go anywhere, ie. safe from cats and toddlers. And it actually looks kind of like a beaded brooch.(I apologize for the poor quality on this picture. The front camera on my phone is not very good.)

I hope this helps you feel more comfortable with knitting with beads!

 

Tassel Tutorial February 16, 2012

Filed under: Nouveau Beaded Capelet,tutorial — mlemmonsdesigns @ 3:41 pm
Tags: , , ,

This tutorial is for how to make the tassels on the Nouveau Beaded Capelet nice and neat while anchoring your tail at the same time.

First start by threading the beads onto your yarn using a beading needle or a floss threader. Then cast on 3 stitches using the long tail cast on with the beads on the working end of the yarn. Leave a long tail, at least 12 inches long, you will use it later.

Knit 1 row.

Step 1: Move 50 beads towards needle. Knit into next stitch, forming a loop of beads, do not pull worked stitch off of left needle. Pull yarn snugly against beads.

Step 2: Transfer stitch back to left hand needle

Step 3: Knit 2 together.

Repeat steps 1-3 two more times so that you have a total of 3 beaded loops.

With the working yarn held above the work, wrap the tail tightly around the top of the beaded loops clockwise 3-4 times.

Then, holding the tail with the working yarn, knit 3. This finishes the tassel instructions. Work the Setup Rows holding the tail and working yarn together as well.